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Find a Tire Retreading and Repair Technician Near You

How to Find a Good Tire Retreading and Repair Technician Near Me?

Over 9% of the total crashes in the United States are as a result of tire-related issues. These issues include, but are not limited to, blowouts, bald tires, underinflation, and tread separation. Hiring a good tire retreading and repair technician near you ensures that your tires are retreaded in line with the minimum acceptable standards, thereby protecting you and other road users from potential road accidents. In addition to this, having your tires inspected and serviced by a professional tire retreading and repair technician extends their lifespan and improves your gas mileage by up to 3.3%.

When considering a tire retreading and repair technician near you, it is always important to find out if they can provide the service you need. A qualified tire retreading and repair technician should be able to perform tread separation, fix punctures, balance tires, and complete wheel alignment procedures, and replacement of faulty valves. Before concluding on hiring a qualified tire retreading and repair technician near you, you should also ask the following questions:

  1. Are You Licensed, Registered, or Certified?

    Auto repair businesses, including tire retreading and repair shops in the United States, are generally required to obtain state-issued licenses. The process and requirements for obtaining these licenses vary by location and so it is a good idea to contact your state's consumer protection agency to find out the specific requirements for your locality.

    Tire retreading and repair technicians may enroll in several certification programs at the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence where they are taught tire repair service procedures and basic standards. Tire retreading and repair technicians may also register with trade associations related to their profession. It is always a good idea to hire a tire retreading and repair technician that belongs to a trade association. Most tire service-related associations ensure that their members are qualified and trained to handle different kinds of tire repairs and provide tire retreading services.

  2. How Much Does It Cost to Hire a Tire Retreading and Repair Technician?

    The cost of hiring a tire retreading and repair technician is determined by factors like the nature of service that the technician is expected to provide, whether the service will be done at your vehicle's location or the technician's repair shop, and the amount of time it will take to complete the work. Tire retreading and repair technicians typically charge customers hourly rates at a range of $15 - $100 per hour for repairs and $80 - $200 for tire retreading, depending on your tire's current tread depth. However, for relatively straightforward repairs like fixing punctures, and blowouts, tire retreading and repair technicians may charge a flat fee. This fee can be as low as $15 - $50, or as high as $50 - $200.

    When you have to hire a tire retreading and repair technician near you, there are certain steps that you can take to ensure that the cost of doing this does not exceed your budget. These steps include:

    • Find out about tire repair prices near you: Though the cost of a tire repair varies by technician, it is always good to have an idea of what a particular type of repair costs in your locality. This will help you avoid paying more than is required for the repair.
    • Avoid driving on a flat tire to the repair shop: A lot of people make the mistake of driving to a repair shop with a bad tire without thinking about the consequences. Driving on a flat tire can turn a minor repair into an expensive vehicular repair such as rim replacement. In addition to this, driving on a flat tire may result in ruptured sidewalls and expanded punctures. Note that repairing a ruptured sidewall is not always a good idea, so if your tire's sidewall is ruptured, you may have to buy a new tire.

What Are Common Tire Retreading and Repair Technician Expenses?

In addition to the standard hourly or fixed fees, you may also incur some additional expenses when you hire a tire retreading and repair technician. Some of these expenses include:

  • Towing expenses: It is never a good idea to drive on a bad tire even if you are taking the vehicle to your technician's shop. When you hire a retreading and repair technician near you, there is still a possibility that you may need to tow the vehicle to the technician's shop. Towing expenses may either be added to your total repair price or billed separately. The average cost of towing a vehicle is $2 - $7 per mile.
  • Trip fees: When you hire a tire retreading and repair technician, there is always the possibility that the technician will have to come to where your vehicle is parked for the repair. Trip fees typically include fuel expenses and hours spent on the road. The average estimated cost of trip fees is between $1 - $5 per mile.
  • Tire replacement expenses: When you hire a tire retreading and repair technician, there is always the possibility that you will need to replace the old tire with a new one. You can either purchase a new tire from the technician's shop or order the new tire elsewhere. If you are purchasing a new tire outside your locality, you may also incur traveling or shipping expenses.

While some tire retreading and repair technicians include these additional costs in your total repair price, other technicians may bill you separately for them. It is always a good idea to discuss a payment structure with your tire retreading and repair technician before they start the job. In addition to this, it is also important to keep records of all payments made to the technician. You should request receipts, invoices, or any other evidence of payment made during the repair.

Who Will Do the Work?

When you take your vehicle to a tire retreading and repair shop, it is always important to find out who will do your work before you leave. While most tire retreading and repair shops will promise you the best services, there is always a possibility that your job will be handled by an apprentice. You should always ensure that the actual tire retreading and repair technician that is designated to fix your tire is duly qualified and experienced. Doing this helps you determine if the technician assigned to you can do the job the way you want it. Do not hesitate to request another technician or take your vehicle to another shop if you are not comfortable with the technician assigned to you. It is also a good idea to hire a technician that is certified because they often have an in-depth understanding of most tire-related issues.

What Qualifications Should a Tire Retreading and Repair Technician Have?

Tire retreading and repair technicians are generally required to have a high school certificate or its educational equivalent. This profession does not require post-secondary education and younger tire retreading and repair technicians acquire work-related skills, knowledge, and experience by learning from more experienced tire retreading and repair technicians. Some tire retreading and repair technicians also acquire training while working as apprentices in big auto repair shops in their locality.

The United States Bureau of Labor estimates that there are over 111, 610 employed tire retreading and repair technicians in the country. Some of these tire retreading and repair technicians obtain certifications from professional bodies like the Tire Industry Association. Although certifications are not a prerequisite for this profession, technicians who enroll in professional certification programs are considered to be more competent and qualified than their colleagues that are not certified.

Will You Provide References?

The state of your vehicle's tire determines most of what happens to you on the road, so you must make the right choice when you need to hire a tire retreading and repair technician. To avoid making mistakes, it is always a good idea to ask a potential tire retreading and repair technician for references. Ask the technician to provide you with information about past clients including their phone numbers and the type of services they were offered. Do not hesitate to reach out to these clients to verify if they were satisfied with the services they received from the technician. You can also get referrals on tire retreading and repair technicians near you from trusted friends and family. You may also find qualified tire retreading and repair technicians near you via Better Business Bureau and other third-party websites that allow customers to post reviews on tire retreading and repair technicians they have patronized.

Quick Facts about Tire Retreading and Repair Technician

2020 Median Pay
$30,060 per year, $14.45 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education
High school diploma or equivalent
Work Experience in a Related Occupation
Less than 5 years
On-the-job Training
Moderate-term on-the-job training
Number of Jobs, 2019
113,400
Job Outlook, 2019-29
1% (Slower than average)
Employment Change, 2019-29
12,000

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Expert Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Tire Retreading and Repair Technicians

Should I Repair or Buy a New Tire?

The decision to repair or buy a new tire is dependent on the extent of damage to your tire at the time of inspection by tire retreading and repair technicians. There is no specific condition that guarantees tire replacement or repair. For instance, punctures close to the tread face of your tire and punctured with holes of ¼ inch or less can be repaired, while punctures that affect the sidewall or the shoulder area of your tire require replacement of the tire. Cut damages that affect your tire's steel belt are not repairable, while cuts that are not deep may be fixed. Also, if your tire was affected by a collision, you may consider replacing it with a new tire. Many professional tire retreading and repair technicians will always inform you when your tire needs a replacement.

How Long Do Retread Tires Last?

Retread tires typically last between two to four years depending on how they are cared for. This is almost as long as new tires, and they can also be driven at any speed the driver chooses.

How Many Times Can You Retread a Tire?

You can retread your tire as many times as the tire allows it. The number of times you are allowed to retread your tire is determined by the condition of the tire and how much damage it has accumulated.

When Is a Tire Too Old to Retread?

A tire is considered too old to retread if it had been in use for six years or more. Most tire retreading and repair technicians will inspect your tire to determine whether it is strong enough to go through a complete retreading process.

Are Retread Tires Good? Is Tire Retreading Safe?

Yes, modern retread tires are good, and retreading is safe. Retread tires are used in the truck and airline industry and also by several school buses in the United States. It is important to understand that tire-related accidents are not caused by retread tires. Most tire-related accidents are caused by bald tires, overinflation, mismatching of tires in dual wheel position, and faulty tire repairs. Note that tire retreading should always be done by a qualified tire retreading technician.

Do Any Standards Control the Quality and Safety of Retreaded Tyres?

Yes, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration regulates the quality and safety standards of retreaded tyres for passenger cars in the United States. Per this agency, the minimum standard tread depth for tires is 4/32 inches on front axles and 2/32 inches on other wheel positions. Note that there are no uniform standards for retreaded tyres of commercial vehicles. However, retread tire manufacturers regulate the quality and safety of these tyres.

How Long Will a Patched Tire Last?

A proper patch may last seven to ten years. However, most tire retreading and repair technicians advise that a tire should not be patched more than once. Doing otherwise may result in tire blowouts.

Is Patching a Tire a Permanent Fix?

No. Even though a proper patch may last for a very long time, it is usually only a temporary fix.

Is It Better to Patch or Plug a Tire?

Both patch and plug repairs are good tire repairs. However, whether one is better than the other depends on the type of tire damage you want to fix. Plugs are a good fix for punctures resulting from a nail or any other blunt object, while patching is better for fixing a tear in the tread of your tire.

Is It Better to Patch a Tire or Get a New One?

Getting a new tire is great but expensive. Most times a patch is all you need to get your tire back in shape but it all depends on the condition of your tire. A minor puncture can be patched easily, while a punctured sidewall means that you have to get a new tire. Similarly, if your tire sustains serious damage due to a crash, then you must replace it immediately.

How Long Does It Take to Repair a Tire?

The amount of time it takes to repair a tire is determined by the type of repair that the tire retreading and repair technician is expected to perform. For instance, patching a tire with a radial patch can take 15 to 20 minutes, while installing a plug may take five to ten minutes. Likewise, fixing a tire valve takes approximately seven to ten minutes while replacing a flat tire can take between 15 and 40 minutes.